Find the Support You Need

Hi, I'm Suzanne! My Integrative Bodywork practice is here to support you.

With over 25 years experience, I'm helping clients move from overwhelm toward health.

Building on what's already working well in your own physiology, I use manual therapy, massage, and Somatic Experiencing to nudge your system back into balance.

My work can help you feel comfortable. Beyond relief of symptoms, you'll get in touch with what's most important to you.   

Yes! Because when your body feels better, your mind benefits too.

So you can begin feeling like yourself again, connecting with people, and enjoying more of what you love!

You'll find the encouragement you need right here.  

We're in the Claremont Village, by appointment Monday through Friday.

Schedule right here online or by phone.  

Learn about my practice (see at right).

Or if you'd like, set up a free 25-min phone consult: 909.239.8313.  

I look forward to hearing from you!


"Think of something racy and funny!" -- that's why we were laughing.
Kathy Kain and Steve Terrell bring their Somatic Regulation and Resilience class to Los Angeles

IMG_2883


Health and Being Real

Here is Gabor Mate, MD, author of When the Body Says No, speaking on "The Need for Authenticity" and its connection to health/ disease.

He lists these risk factors for disease: 

1) automatic concern for the emotional needs of others, ignoring your own

2) compulsive identification with duty and responsibility, rather authentic self

3) suppressing, repressing "negative" emotions

4) belief that you are responsible for how others feel, and fear of disappointing them

We don't do this on purpose! No! He says this results from our adapting unconsciously, to protect ourselves.  

From youtube channel science and nonduality.  Listen in.

 


Toward and Away

"I don't want to lose you.  But I need my space!" IMG_1362
 
Setting limits in relationships, valuing our own feelings while staying in connection with others, wow, to me it sometimes feels rocky and uphill all the way.  Are you also getting stuck on that step?
 
As part of my somatic training, I've learned that to get close, we first need to be able to say "no."
 
Let's approach the need for healthy aggression from the bottom up: 
 
 Step down first.  
 Stand on your two feet, your two legs.
 You can't step up
     till you step down.
 
Getting grounded connects you to your lower body as a foundation for everything above it. Your feet, legs, pelvis are right there under you, so when you're feeling, then expressing, there's a there there.
 
For me, and for many of my clients, it's not enough to just understand in my head. My bodywork and somatic practice supports people struggling with relationships, find agency, strength, and resilience. Finding the there in their bodies that stabilizes the response to stress. Giving voice to the "no" that hasn't always been heard.  
 
In a typical session, we'll explore movement toward -- and away from -- whatever is coming up in the moment.  Yes, we'll do that by actually moving in space in whichever direction the body leads.  We'll use what's already happening rather than making it up. Memories, thoughts, images that emerge, we'll use what gets us from motion into e-motion -- or the other way around.  So you can imagine that a client might be standing or seated, as well as having a chance to be horizontal on the table.  
 
This month, I'm taking the third module of "Somatic Regulation and Resilience" with Kathy Kain and Steve Terrell, to deepen my touchwork with early developmental trauma.
 
Please keep your questions coming.  I'm glad to be here for you -- and for me too!
 
I Love You -- Go Away artist Jeanne-Marie Lovell
https://www.facebook.com/FeraL-Clothing-162395904652/
 
 

3 Building Blocks to Resilience

IMG_2770Regain balance in your body's capacity for healthy adaptive response -- resilience -- starting with these three practices. 

Respect your body's wisdom.

Support what's working well in your body already -- by noticing what you can about how that is happening now.

Luckily, we don't have to tell our hearts to keep pumping, our lungs to inflate and deflate, to duck when a softball is headed our way, to yell "ow" when the knife slips.  These automatic, reflexive responses, just like the Fight - Flight - Freeze responses, kick in when the body senses protection is needed.

Just by noticing these under-the-radar rhythms, small changes begin.  Really!  That is, in fact, how our nervous systems adapt: by changing in small ways based on input.  Small input, easier for the system to digest.

Start by noticing how breath comes in and out, all by itself. Want to play with a small input? Breathe OUT - 2 - 3 - 4.  The rest will follow.

Rest.  

Nearly all of us need more rest! How does your body let you know?  Plan a little down time in every day. Five minutes is a start: Stop to smell pleasant aromas, exhale, and move on. 

Honor the wish to sleep longer by scheduling it.  

Busy at work or school, non-stop?

Seeing multiple health care providers, fitness trainers, coaches?  

Allow ample time between engagements.  This allows your system to integrate smaller chunks of input. 

Yeah, I know.  Sounds good when you read about it, but carving out rest time is the most difficult thing for me, too.  Come back to this one later.

Re-orient.  

The children's series, Where's Waldo? challenges us to locate and identify Waldo in a crowded environment.  Imagine that is you, wearing the red striped shirt in the crowd.  How do you know where you are?  We look, listen, and find ourselves in space by sensing, inside and outside. Orienting is recognized as a discrete stage in the body's organizing process to protect itself from threat.  Over milliseconds, the body takes in lots of information before mobilizing the energy needed to act, moving away or toward.  Info-gathering at this level happens well below cognitive decision control!  Eyes, ears, nose, throat are involved big-time, of course, along with sensors for space, movement, gravity, pressure.

A re-orienting practice you might try could start by checking the calendar.  Do you have ten minutes or so right now? If you'd like, set a timer to end your practice. Then, like the example of Waldo, above, check out what's around you now.  Let your gaze wander to what's familiar or interesting as you look around.  Take your time as you explore finding "you" in the midst of "here".  Feel where the edge of you stops and the ground or other surfaces begin.  Remember that you set your timer, and you can come back anytime.


Nervous System Reboot

It's time to ReFresh!  And maybe Reboot...

Today I'm sharing contact info for my professional colleague, Irene Lyon, who lives in Canada, and -- like me -- has trained in Peter Levine's Somatic Experiencing model.

She's developing ways for more people to learn the importance of our nervous systems in healing trauma, online.  From her website, you can access a bunch of educational resources, some free and some requiring payment.

A few months ago, I included links here to a few of her videos because a) they educate about a topic I feel is important and b) they were free.  

But soon after, I removed the link!  (And a few of you noticed -- sorry if you missed it!)

Irene was going to soon remove the free videos from her site, anyway!  When she announced that, I saw her "free video" offer as another example of being into yet another marketing scheme. I apologize if that's how you feel, too!  Remember, if you're concerned about receiving too many emails, you may always unsubscribe.

Bottom line, though, the educational resources she provides are proving worthwhile.  Already, a handful of my clients have reported that it's helped them understand more about their own somatic experience.

All this is to say, you're making an informed choice when you go to irenelyon.com.  

Just have your delete key handy for the marketing emails.