Getting Like, Totally, Unstuck

So about this Sunday: are you still on the fence?

That is, stuck?  Well, that fence looks uncomfortable!  Sign up to join us, with caveat below!

In case you are just tuning in, this workshop is called, Getting Unstuck, and it's 9:45 till 1, 5th of November.  You'll have 3 of us presenting in turn, each providing content and experiential so you are learning from different perspectives.

A few people have asked, "So am I going to be Unstuck, like, Forever?  Hahaha," they say, hopefully, "Maybe?"

Umm, no.

No quick fixes.  But the insights we'll be sharing have made a difference for our clients. 

Here's how you'll benefit from attending:

  • what stuckness is, and why it's a default for many of us
  • where to find balance among polarities
  • science of sensing; gain insights into your own behavior
  • risk trying something new -- safely!
  • anchoring new practices for flexibility and flow

And that's just my piece:  Cynthia and Rachel have their own bullet points!

Getting Unstuck: A Whole-Person Way Forward 

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Sunday morning, November 5, 2017

9:45 am - 1:00 pm

Sign up here 

$60 payable online or at the door 

Location: event address provided when you sign up.

Learn ways of moving from feelings of stuckness into flow. Perspectives from Chinese medicine, somatic practice, and integral coaching.

We invite all of you here. 

 

Warm regards,

Cynthia Luna, integral coaching

Rachel Mefferd, L.Ac, acupuncturist

Suzanne Snijder van Wissenkerke, SEP

 

 


Toward and Away

"I don't want to lose you.  But I need my space!" IMG_1362
 
Setting limits in relationships, valuing our own feelings while staying in connection with others, wow, to me it sometimes feels rocky and uphill all the way.  Are you also getting stuck on that step?
 
As part of my somatic training, I've learned that to get close, we first need to be able to say "no."
 
Let's approach the need for healthy aggression from the bottom up: 
 
 Step down first.  
 Stand on your two feet, your two legs.
 You can't step up
     till you step down.
 
Getting grounded connects you to your lower body as a foundation for everything above it. Your feet, legs, pelvis are right there under you, so when you're feeling, then expressing, there's a there there.
 
For me, and for many of my clients, it's not enough to just understand in my head. My bodywork and somatic practice supports people struggling with relationships, find agency, strength, and resilience. Finding the there in their bodies that stabilizes the response to stress. Giving voice to the "no" that hasn't always been heard.  
 
In a typical session, we'll explore movement toward -- and away from -- whatever is coming up in the moment.  Yes, we'll do that by actually moving in space in whichever direction the body leads.  We'll use what's already happening rather than making it up. Memories, thoughts, images that emerge, we'll use what gets us from motion into e-motion -- or the other way around.  So you can imagine that a client might be standing or seated, as well as having a chance to be horizontal on the table.  
 
This month, I'm taking the third module of "Somatic Regulation and Resilience" with Kathy Kain and Steve Terrell, to deepen my touchwork with early developmental trauma.
 
Please keep your questions coming.  I'm glad to be here for you -- and for me too!
 
I Love You -- Go Away artist Jeanne-Marie Lovell
https://www.facebook.com/FeraL-Clothing-162395904652/
 
 

3 Building Blocks to Resilience

IMG_2770Regain balance in your body's capacity for healthy adaptive response -- resilience -- starting with these three practices. 

Respect your body's wisdom.

Support what's working well in your body already -- by noticing what you can about how that is happening now.

Luckily, we don't have to tell our hearts to keep pumping, our lungs to inflate and deflate, to duck when a softball is headed our way, to yell "ow" when the knife slips.  These automatic, reflexive responses, just like the Fight - Flight - Freeze responses, kick in when the body senses protection is needed.

Just by noticing these under-the-radar rhythms, small changes begin.  Really!  That is, in fact, how our nervous systems adapt: by changing in small ways based on input.  Small input, easier for the system to digest.

Start by noticing how breath comes in and out, all by itself. Want to play with a small input? Breathe OUT - 2 - 3 - 4.  The rest will follow.

Rest.  

Nearly all of us need more rest! How does your body let you know?  Plan a little down time in every day. Five minutes is a start: Stop to smell pleasant aromas, exhale, and move on. 

Honor the wish to sleep longer by scheduling it.  

Busy at work or school, non-stop?

Seeing multiple health care providers, fitness trainers, coaches?  

Allow ample time between engagements.  This allows your system to integrate smaller chunks of input. 

Yeah, I know.  Sounds good when you read about it, but carving out rest time is the most difficult thing for me, too.  Come back to this one later.

Re-orient.  

The children's series, Where's Waldo? challenges us to locate and identify Waldo in a crowded environment.  Imagine that is you, wearing the red striped shirt in the crowd.  How do you know where you are?  We look, listen, and find ourselves in space by sensing, inside and outside. Orienting is recognized as a discrete stage in the body's organizing process to protect itself from threat.  Over milliseconds, the body takes in lots of information before mobilizing the energy needed to act, moving away or toward.  Info-gathering at this level happens well below cognitive decision control!  Eyes, ears, nose, throat are involved big-time, of course, along with sensors for space, movement, gravity, pressure.

A re-orienting practice you might try could start by checking the calendar.  Do you have ten minutes or so right now? If you'd like, set a timer to end your practice. Then, like the example of Waldo, above, check out what's around you now.  Let your gaze wander to what's familiar or interesting as you look around.  Take your time as you explore finding "you" in the midst of "here".  Feel where the edge of you stops and the ground or other surfaces begin.  Remember that you set your timer, and you can come back anytime.


College Students, Welcome Back!

With the return of fall semester comes the rhythm of practicums, performances, and exams.  Here's an exercise to invite your body to settle.  Try this in someplace quiet enough for you.  

Grounding & Resourcing (about 10 min)        

Sit in a supported position, both feet on the floor.  Take time to notice your natural breath, particularly your exhale.  Slowly push the sole of one foot into the floor as you exhale, releasing on the inhale.  Alternate left and right.  Slow your movements even more, to explore the sensations.  Look for what feels good!  If your eyes are closed, try opening them a little and check out your environment. 

As you look around, what attracts you?  Let your eyes rest there awhile before moving on.  Allow your attention to move your head as your eyes gently take in something new of interest. Notice how the breath changes as you do this.  Take all the time you need.

 


Here, Now

Playing piano since age five gave me a great head start in bodywork.  Listening with hands and ears, moving to match dynamics and tempo with the big picture, are skills developed in my musician's toolkit. 

Grounded in nature and spirit ---  we canoed every summer in the Boundary Waters --- I was inspired by my chemist father to study sciences.  A biology degree, and a dozen unrelated jobs later, led to "why not try something for fun?" A massage course.  Yes, this was it. Working manually with the human body ignited joy in me, especially when emphasizing structural problem-solving.  Analyzing biomechanical patterns was a head game I could master.

But there is so much more!  After eight years of working mechanically, I gave up trying to absorb more analytic protocols.  While I value the foundation in structural work, it's through Somatic Experiencing(R) , that I finally grew to embrace the freedom of “not knowing.”   

Playing only what's written?  Not anymore.  My current practice is full of improvisation, rewarding me with daily discovery, inspiration and challenge --- and yes, benefiting my clients!  My steps from keyboard, to science and nature, to integrative bodywork, connect me in a theme of moving notes.  Now, sitting with a client, I continue to listen for the notes between:  the ones that, in relationship with the others, create harmony or dissonance, and can lead on to the next notes."