Getting Like, Totally, Unstuck

So about this Sunday: are you still on the fence?

That is, stuck?  Well, that fence looks uncomfortable!  Sign up to join us, with caveat below!

In case you are just tuning in, this workshop is called, Getting Unstuck, and it's 9:45 till 1, 5th of November.  You'll have 3 of us presenting in turn, each providing content and experiential so you are learning from different perspectives.

A few people have asked, "So am I going to be Unstuck, like, Forever?  Hahaha," they say, hopefully, "Maybe?"

Umm, no.

No quick fixes.  But the insights we'll be sharing have made a difference for our clients. 

Here's how you'll benefit from attending:

  • what stuckness is, and why it's a default for many of us
  • where to find balance among polarities
  • science of sensing; gain insights into your own behavior
  • risk trying something new -- safely!
  • anchoring new practices for flexibility and flow

And that's just my piece:  Cynthia and Rachel have their own bullet points!

Getting Unstuck: A Whole-Person Way Forward 

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Sunday morning, November 5, 2017

9:45 am - 1:00 pm

Sign up here 

$60 payable online or at the door 

Location: event address provided when you sign up.

Learn ways of moving from feelings of stuckness into flow. Perspectives from Chinese medicine, somatic practice, and integral coaching.

We invite all of you here. 

 

Warm regards,

Cynthia Luna, integral coaching

Rachel Mefferd, L.Ac, acupuncturist

Suzanne Snijder van Wissenkerke, SEP

 

 


Toward and Away

"I don't want to lose you.  But I need my space!" IMG_1362
 
Setting limits in relationships, valuing our own feelings while staying in connection with others, wow, to me it sometimes feels rocky and uphill all the way.  Are you also getting stuck on that step?
 
As part of my somatic training, I've learned that to get close, we first need to be able to say "no."
 
Let's approach the need for healthy aggression from the bottom up: 
 
 Step down first.  
 Stand on your two feet, your two legs.
 You can't step up
     till you step down.
 
Getting grounded connects you to your lower body as a foundation for everything above it. Your feet, legs, pelvis are right there under you, so when you're feeling, then expressing, there's a there there.
 
For me, and for many of my clients, it's not enough to just understand in my head. My bodywork and somatic practice supports people struggling with relationships, find agency, strength, and resilience. Finding the there in their bodies that stabilizes the response to stress. Giving voice to the "no" that hasn't always been heard.  
 
In a typical session, we'll explore movement toward -- and away from -- whatever is coming up in the moment.  Yes, we'll do that by actually moving in space in whichever direction the body leads.  We'll use what's already happening rather than making it up. Memories, thoughts, images that emerge, we'll use what gets us from motion into e-motion -- or the other way around.  So you can imagine that a client might be standing or seated, as well as having a chance to be horizontal on the table.  
 
This month, I'm taking the third module of "Somatic Regulation and Resilience" with Kathy Kain and Steve Terrell, to deepen my touchwork with early developmental trauma.
 
Please keep your questions coming.  I'm glad to be here for you -- and for me too!
 
I Love You -- Go Away artist Jeanne-Marie Lovell
https://www.facebook.com/FeraL-Clothing-162395904652/
 
 

How the Light Shines In

It's only from shadow that we can 'see the light'

only from winter's dark days welcome spring

It's where we're broken and vulnerable 

that the light can shine in

Now

teeth bared breath held bracing against fear time stops but --- aahh!

Bringing into my now the walking-in-this-forest-together feeling

Remembering in my legs the right-left rhythm, my breath slows

Fear and forest mix

Till what shines through is neither and both

Emerging: warmth, compassion for self

for living

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With gratitude to my daughter for this photo and for taking us hiking at Mount Si, Washington.  


Moving Anger Out from a Holding Pattern

Here's an interesting blog post about anger from a therapist named Robert Firestone.  Number one in his list of effects of denying or suppressing anger is somaticizing -- creating physical symptoms. 

"Holding back angry feelings creates tension, and this stress reaction plays a part in a wide range of psychosomatic ailments, such as headaches, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and cancer."

Many of us have learned to pooh-pooh what may come along with anger that's held:  the constriction, the pain, the frustrating lack of momentum.   Ignoring it doesn't make it go away!    Among my bodywork clients are some whose hunched neck/shoulders are actually compromising their heart/lung functional capacity --- which compounds with anxiety as the heart races or "I can't breathe!"   For some, a holding pattern like this snowballs into a syndrome, a complex tangle of symptoms.  

To successfully address physical symptoms, my therapeutic approach will often integrate multiple elements of human experience: emotion, meaning, behavior, sensation, image.  Combining Somatic Experiencing with gentle bodywork is what I find most effective.

A few more thoughts about allowing anger to be part of the mix of feelings we experience:

1)    Feeling a feeling -- any feeling -- It's not right or wrong, it just is!   This is part of the job of our physical bodies.  When we sense a feeling, the body gets a message to move.  Toward something attractive, away if not attractive.  Checking in with where in your body might want to move right now is a great place to start.  For example, a nice breath out!  -- Aahhh! 

2)    Feeling an impulse to move is not the same as following through with aggressive actions!   To develop more impulse control, experiment with letting go of some control!   Sound counter-intuitive?  In a Somatic Experiencing session, we might explore feeling that edge between extreme-absolute-control and a-little-bit-of-movement.   

3)    What's the opposite of anger?  Again, not a right or wrong answer here, just an invitation to explore that for a moment, sitting away from your screen to feel whatever it is for you.     Give yourself enough time so that when you come back to a feeling of anger, there's this other feeling your body remembers as well.  Something to gently swing back to.

 

 


sense of myself as a resilient container

I am an artist in my mid-forties.  I spent many years of my life in psychotherapy and self help, but could not seem to shake the perpetual emotional pain and anxiety which crippled my daily functioning.  A friend shared books about Somatic Experiencing, and I realized I could not heal myself alone.  I found Suzanne via the "Find a Practitioner" at www.traumahealing.com.  Her gentle style immediately put me at ease and established a relationship of trust.  

I really appreciate how Suzanne is available for me when I am triggered.  A phone call or visit to her office resets my attitude and empowers me to proceed with my day calmly.  She reads me so well, picking up on subtle signs how my system is doing.  Her supportive touch is tremendously healing as it enables me to discharge pent-up anxiety and stress.  As our series of sessions continues, I am putting experiences in her office together with the lingo I learned while reading about S.E.;  gaining a tangible sense of myself as a resilient container.  

Receiving her gentle visceral bodywork [an osteopathic approach that complements S.E.] is making me aware of my own internal anatomy, and awakening my inner health advocate.  This year I got serious about attending regular [every 2 weeks] sessions.  Rather than just soothing me and helping me to put out emotional fires, I have made significant progress in both my personal and professional life.  I feel that Suzanne's help has empowered me with the confidence to meet with clients and to achieve artwork I never had the stamina for before.   I feel very fortunate to have discovered her practice.  -- Jeanne-Marie Lovell


Highlighting Healing Stories

http://besthealingstories.reversingchronicpain.com/

I am grateful to Kristen for writing her account of healing (excerpted on my site as well), and to Maggie Phillips, who created this blog and shares healing stories from readers.  Maggie is an international educator, psychologist, and author of Reversing Chronic Pain.  I often refer clients to her as she offers an array of resources.  Check out her other resources online:

Maggie Phillips, Ph.D.
2768 Darnby Dr.
Oakland, CA 94611
USA
510-655-3843



As I read these stories, I'm reminded that there is no "one way"; that experiences leading to healing will be unique to each of us, further illustrating the creativity of the healing response. 

Do you have a story to share?