Getting Like, Totally, Unstuck

So about this Sunday: are you still on the fence?

That is, stuck?  Well, that fence looks uncomfortable!  Sign up to join us, with caveat below!

In case you are just tuning in, this workshop is called, Getting Unstuck, and it's 9:45 till 1, 5th of November.  You'll have 3 of us presenting in turn, each providing content and experiential so you are learning from different perspectives.

A few people have asked, "So am I going to be Unstuck, like, Forever?  Hahaha," they say, hopefully, "Maybe?"

Umm, no.

No quick fixes.  But the insights we'll be sharing have made a difference for our clients. 

Here's how you'll benefit from attending:

  • what stuckness is, and why it's a default for many of us
  • where to find balance among polarities
  • science of sensing; gain insights into your own behavior
  • risk trying something new -- safely!
  • anchoring new practices for flexibility and flow

And that's just my piece:  Cynthia and Rachel have their own bullet points!

Getting Unstuck: A Whole-Person Way Forward 

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Sunday morning, November 5, 2017

9:45 am - 1:00 pm

Sign up here 

$60 payable online or at the door 

Location: event address provided when you sign up.

Learn ways of moving from feelings of stuckness into flow. Perspectives from Chinese medicine, somatic practice, and integral coaching.

We invite all of you here. 

 

Warm regards,

Cynthia Luna, integral coaching

Rachel Mefferd, L.Ac, acupuncturist

Suzanne Snijder van Wissenkerke, SEP

 

 


Nature Walks Heal

NYT article describes how a walk in the park may soothe the mind and, in the process, change the workings of our brains in ways that improve our mental health.

And I would add, hiking in our nearby mountains!  Starting early in the day works best for me -- beat the heat and let the day unfold from there.  Call if you'd like to join me on a hike sometime!  

This is along the trail at Icehouse Canyon, about a month ago.

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Less Talk, More Therapy

"I read this New York Times article and decided to see whether there was anybody in Claremont who could help me."  

This, from a new client today who found me online, as "you seem to offer more than a normal massage therapist."  She says she has put up with the pain long enough and is ready to explore change from the body perspective.  

Yay!   First step in seeking well-being is saying, "Enough!" and feeling open to ask questions about what could be different.  Then, who to trust along the way.  Many of my clients are right there at that edge of discovery.  It's a time ripe for experimenting.

Q:  So does this article come close to describing what you do?

A:  Well, sometimes. Often. Depends on what client is open to explore, their stated goals, and how the body calls. Some sessions more like "normal" massage, even deep tissue. Sometimes a whole session is a story-led sensory exploration, all while sitting in chairs, moving a bit, bringing awareness outside on purpose, not even using the table. My goal is always integration... a topic that warrants its own article!

 

 


sense of myself as a resilient container

I am an artist in my mid-forties.  I spent many years of my life in psychotherapy and self help, but could not seem to shake the perpetual emotional pain and anxiety which crippled my daily functioning.  A friend shared books about Somatic Experiencing, and I realized I could not heal myself alone.  I found Suzanne via the "Find a Practitioner" at www.traumahealing.com.  Her gentle style immediately put me at ease and established a relationship of trust.  

I really appreciate how Suzanne is available for me when I am triggered.  A phone call or visit to her office resets my attitude and empowers me to proceed with my day calmly.  She reads me so well, picking up on subtle signs how my system is doing.  Her supportive touch is tremendously healing as it enables me to discharge pent-up anxiety and stress.  As our series of sessions continues, I am putting experiences in her office together with the lingo I learned while reading about S.E.;  gaining a tangible sense of myself as a resilient container.  

Receiving her gentle visceral bodywork [an osteopathic approach that complements S.E.] is making me aware of my own internal anatomy, and awakening my inner health advocate.  This year I got serious about attending regular [every 2 weeks] sessions.  Rather than just soothing me and helping me to put out emotional fires, I have made significant progress in both my personal and professional life.  I feel that Suzanne's help has empowered me with the confidence to meet with clients and to achieve artwork I never had the stamina for before.   I feel very fortunate to have discovered her practice.  -- Jeanne-Marie Lovell


College Students, Welcome Back!

With the return of fall semester comes the rhythm of practicums, performances, and exams.  Here's an exercise to invite your body to settle.  Try this in someplace quiet enough for you.  

Grounding & Resourcing (about 10 min)        

Sit in a supported position, both feet on the floor.  Take time to notice your natural breath, particularly your exhale.  Slowly push the sole of one foot into the floor as you exhale, releasing on the inhale.  Alternate left and right.  Slow your movements even more, to explore the sensations.  Look for what feels good!  If your eyes are closed, try opening them a little and check out your environment. 

As you look around, what attracts you?  Let your eyes rest there awhile before moving on.  Allow your attention to move your head as your eyes gently take in something new of interest. Notice how the breath changes as you do this.  Take all the time you need.